Setting goals based on your mission statement

Yesterday we talked about how your mission statement is the overall way for you to achieve your vision.

Today, we’re going to break your mission statement down into goals.


If your mission statement says you are going to develop content to pursue your vision of helping people or grow your business to new levels, then your goals should reflect what kind of content and when you will have it developed.

If your mission statement says you want to build healthy, loving relations with family or friends, then you want your goals to tell you how you can do that. Do you want to start having a neighborhood table where people can come in and get to know each other better? Or would you start scheduling to have a date night with your wife or family game night?

Whatever your mission statement says you need to have goals on how to continue on your mission.

S.M.A.R.T.

If you haven’t heard about SMART goals, I’m going to give you a quick overview of what they look like so you can begin writing your own to accomplish your mission and live out your vision.

Specific

– Make your goal as specific as possible. Don’t just write you want to meet new people or spend time with family and friends. Rather, you should say why you want to do it or how.

I want to spend more time with my family and friends to cultivate relationships by going out to dinner and doing an activity afterwards.”

Measurable

– Now that you have a specific goal, let’s make it more measurable. How do you know when you’ve achieved this goal? The best way I’ve found to be able to do this is add numbers to the goal. We’ll take our specific goal and now add something to say this:

“I want to spend one night a week with my family to play games and one night a month with my friends to cultivate relationships by going out to dinner and doing an activity afterwards.”

Attainable or Achievable

– Attainable goals stretch your abilities a little. While it’s great to have the goal of spending time with friends and family. Why not make it more meaningful and add new relationships to the mix. For some people this isn’t challenging, but for some people, it’s very difficult. Now your goal could sound something like this:

“I want to spend one night a week with my family to play games, one night a month with friends by going out to dinner and an activity, and I’ll invite one new person I’ve met each month to coffee to cultivate old and new relationships.”

Relevant & Realistic

– To have a relevant and realistic goal you have to look at two things.

  1. The first thing to look at would be is the goal relevant to your mission. Is it relevant to the vision you have for your life? Is it relevant to you?
  2. The second thing is if the goal is realistic? In our example, you’re blocking off roughly 2-4 hours a week for family, 3-4 hours a month for friends, and about 1-2 hours a month for new people you’ve met. Is this realistic with your current schedule? I believe it is, but for some it might not be. Be realistic when you’re making your goals or they won’t be achievable.
Time-Bound

– This is where you can find out when your goal will be met. In our current example, the goal is an on-going goal, but that doesn’t mean it can’t have a deadline to when you’ve started doing it. Make sure you have a deadline for every goal you write so you don’t put it off until it’s ultimately forgotten. Your new goal should look something like this when it’s done:

“I want to spend one night a week with my family to play games, one night a month with friends by going out to dinner and an activity, and I’ll invite one new person I’ve met each month to coffee to cultivate old and new relationship. I want to have the next 6 months (or year) scheduled for these items by the end of June 1st.”

I’ll break the goal down one more time to help you see how it’s a SMART goal, and then it’s time for you to write your own SMART goals for your mission.

“I want to spend one night a week with my family to play games, one night a month with friends by going out to dinner and an activity, and I’ll invite one new person I’ve met each month to coffee to cultivate old and new relationship. I want to have the next 6 months (or year) scheduled for these items by the end of June 1st.”

Red lettering makes this goal SPECIFIC

Blue lettering makes this goal MEASURABLE

Purple and underlined lettering makes this goal Attainable/Achievable

The entire meaning behind the statement (achieves your mission) is what makes this goal RELEVANT & REALISTIC

Orange lettering makes this goal TIME-BOUND

Write Them Down

Now that you know what your SMART goal should look like, it’s time for you to write your own. Write goals for different time frames. Write your goals for a month out, a year out, 5 and 10 years out. By breaking your goals into various time frames, you are able to see progress as you go through life, and know you are staying aligned with your mission.

Come back for day 5 of creating your plan, and we’ll see the last piece of the puzzle to achieving your vision for life.

 

Word of the Week Planning

Parker Waldrop

Parker Waldrop has taken every opportunity in his career to train & develop others. With over 15 years of training & development experience, he has trained hundreds of employees, leaders, and students in a variety of areas of expertise. With a heart to please God, Parker has found his calling of helping develop others and help them follow their passion.

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